Protecting Public Health and the Environment.

Idaho Environmental Guide for Local Governments: Water Quality

Drinking Water

In Idaho, some 1,960 public drinking water systems (PWS) serve Idaho's population. If a city, district, or other entity owns and operates a public drinking water system, it is responsible for producing safe drinking water, thereby protecting the health of its citizens and fulfilling the requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act and other state and federal rules and requirements. Local governments have authority to help protect drinking water beyond requirements of state and federal laws and regulations. Learn more.

Ground Water

Ground water is a key resource supporting many aspects of Idaho's way of life. It replenishes our streams and rivers and provides fresh water for irrigation, industry, and communities. Around nine billion gallons of ground water are withdrawn every day for various uses in the state. The water that flows from the tap likely comes from ground water, as it provides 95% of the state's drinking water. Local governments have authority to implement ordinances that restrict ground water contamination beyond state and federal laws and regulations.  Learn more.

Source Water

Source water is untreated water from streams, rivers, lakes, or aquifers (ground water) that is used to provide public drinking water and to supply private wells used for human consumption. Source water protection is a process that enables communities to protect ground water and surface water supplies that serve as sources for drinking water. Local governments have authority to manage potential sources of source water contamination within their jurisdictions. Learn more.

Surface Water

Surface water is all water that is naturally open to the atmosphere, such as lakes, rivers, streams, and reservoirs. Surface water pollution can result from a number of sources, including dredging, stormwater runoff, and industrial or municipal wastewater discharges. Local governments have authority to implement ordinances that help prevent stormwater pollution beyond federal and state laws and regulations. Learn more.

Wastewater

Wastewater is spent or used water, such as from households and businesses, that contains enough harmful material to damage water quality. Every building with running water generates some sort of wastewater. If a city, district, or other entity owns and operates a wastewater collection or treatment system, it is responsible for protecting the health of its citizens and fulfilling the requirements of state and federal rules and permits for collecting, treating, and disposing of the wastewater. Learn more.


Staff Contacts

Water Quality Manager
Lance Holloway
DEQ Boise Regional Office
1445 N. Orchard St.
Boise, ID 83706
(208) 373-0550
lance.holloway@deq.idaho.gov

Water Quality Manager
Thomas Herron
DEQ Coeur d'Alene Regional Office
2110 Ironwood Parkway
Coeur d'Alene, ID 83814
(208) 666-4631
thomas.herron@deq.idaho.gov

Water Quality Manager
Troy Saffle
DEQ Idaho Falls Regional Office
900 N. Skyline Drive, Suite B
Idaho Falls, ID 83402
(208) 528-2650
troy.saffle@deq.idaho.gov

Regional Administrator
John Cardwell
DEQ Lewiston Regional Office
1118 "F" St.
Lewiston, ID 83501
(208) 799-4370
john.cardwell@deq.idaho.gov

Water Quality Manager
Lynn Van Every
DEQ Pocatello Regional Office
444 Hospital Way #300
Pocatello, ID 83201
(208) 236-6160
lynn.vanevery@deq.idaho.gov

Water Quality Manager
Dr. Balthasar Buhidar
DEQ Twin Falls Regional Office
650 Addison Avenue West, Suite 110
Twin Falls, ID 83301
(208) 736-2190
balthasar.buhidar@deq.idaho.gov